Breaking News: Ford and Tesla Merger, Mercury Revival

What? Were you expecting a witty satirical article?

I spent longer than I should have making this. It was originally going to be a tasteless grill swap but it turned into a combination of the the lowest tech car of its time and the most high tech car of its time that no doubt makes each car worse. Continue reading

2007 Lifted “Off-Road” Crown Victoria Pt.2 Buying A Government Car

Less than two weeks after selling the ‘copped out’ 2003 P71 I found myself behind the wheel of a nice 2007 P71.  This time I took a different approach, instead of buying the car through Craigslist or a private party I would buy it directly from the government via an online auction.  In the past I had only purchased bicycles and video game hardware this way, pretty low risk stuff. An entire car is a pretty big step up but I figured I would give it shot. Continue reading

2007 Lifted “Off-Road” Crown Victoria Pt.1 Purchasing

The goal here is to purchase a used 2003+ P71 Crown Victoria for the sole purpose of modifying to drive around on desert trails and forest roads.  Why a Crown Victoria?  They are cheap, body on frame, V8, rear wheel drive, super reliable, plus with the additional coolers and suspension components for police use it’ll hold up.  I have no interest in actual ‘wheeling’ or owning a truck so it’s perfect, plus an off-road car is more visually interesting (to me).

My plan is to install a set of 3-inch lift cups/spacers intended for donks on 28’s and some all-terrain 31’s for the stock 16 inch police steel wheels. Continue reading

Barrett-Jackson 2017: 1979 Ford F-100

This one goes to eleven. Black paint, supercharged small block Ford with over 600hp, 3.70:1 end and a TKO 5-speed. Chrome everywhere and classic f-series looks. It has an image that says, “Clear a path.” 

I was drawn immediately to this truck upon seeing it, and I must have not been the only one as it went for $16,500 on the Scottdale auction block. 

If you’d like to see the lot listing for this truck, please click here. 

Barrett-Jackson 2017: 1986 Grand Prix 2+2


One of the more interesting vehicles found at Barrett-Jackson this year was this Pontiac Grand Prix 2+2. Among the more high-profile G-bodies like the Monte Carlo, El Camino, Cutlass and Buick T-type, the Pontiac tends to become more of a forgotten offering. Couple that with this aerodynamic-enhancing body conversion by Auto-Fab for homologation purposes and you find yourself with one interesting piece of history.

Being one of only 1,225 Grand Prix models converted, it’s provenance is evident in it’s smooth Firebird/Camaro-esque rear windshield, revised front fascia and small fiberglass trunk lid. That’s correct: Despite it’s appearance, that window is static, not hatch.

And that lack of useful storage space is only one of the many issues that kept this production variant out of the General Motors limelight. The lackluster performance from the 150hp 5.0L carbureted v8 available only through the 2004r auto and a 3.08:1 rear end ratio didn’t help either. If you remember correctly, even the lowly Monte Carlo SS had an alternative 180hp variant during it’s run, not to mention the offerings from Buick and Oldsmobile.

Despite it’s shortcomings, aesthetically it’s a stud in the confines of it’s era. Which, along with it’s rareness, is probably why this well-kept, low-mileage example went for an impressive $11,000 at auction.

 


Check out the lot listing for this vehicle over at Barrett-Jackson.com

1990 Buick Reatta Coupe

1990-buick-reatta-profileIf you saw my last post about the Chrysler TC by Maserati, you know the background leading up to the highly competitive luxury coupe market of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Today, we’re going to take a look at Buick’s short-lived attempt at cracking into this market segment.

The Reatta was a two-seat coupe that went on sale in 1988. Like the Chrysler TC, it was intended to be a top-of-the-line model, available at a premium price. Though the Reatta is in the same vehicle segment as the TC, Buick’s approach was completely different from Chrysler’s. Continue reading