How to Change Your Oil: A Step by Step Guide

In this guide, I am going to show you how to change your own oil even if you have never done it before. There are several reasons why I recommend learning to change your own oil. These include:

  • It’s actually not that difficult
  • You can save money
  • You can build confidence working on your car
  • Be more in tune with how your car is running

NOTE: This guide is written for the complete novice/beginner, so bear with me for the lengthy explanations.

PART I: PREPARATION
Most of the work in changing your own oil is in gathering the supplies. Once you have all of the items you need, performing the work should take no more than 30-60 minutes. So here’s what you need to get started:

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Rebuilding a Rochester QuadraJet Carburetor

In January of 2009, myself and two friends purchased a 1977 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Landau coupe for $600. Under the hood, it had a small block 350 V8 engine with a Rochester QuadraJet carburetor. The car ran but didn’t have much power. We were too focused on doing body work to worry about the engine at first.

In the summer of 2011, I decided to take a look at the rebuilding the carburetor. I found a couple of companies that offered rebuild services by mail. The cost seemed to be around $400 dollars – almost as much as we paid for the whole car!

Having ruled that option out, I looked at the cost of buying a Holley or other brand of carburetor. Again, the prices were way out of my range ($280 to $400). There was only one option left: to rebuild it myself.

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FFT: Pulling the 455 Top End

Amidst all of the 2012 SEMA hubbub, I bring you the latest installment on my 455 Oldsmobile-powered 1965 C-10, better known as: The Futuramic Farm Truck.

As you know this time of year is not a productive in terms of free hours to work or money to spend. I’ve been putting off breaking out the impact gun and yanking the top end on the 455 because I spun it over and checked the oil when I traded it for my boat anchor smog-era 350. I had some free time between trees, turkeys and all that other stuff to get a little bit done, so this is what I chose to do. Like my piece on the rear suspension for my daily driver: Valkyrie, I’m going to be doing this article in a captioned picture style to illustrate what was going on as I did it. I hope you enjoy the change of pace, any comments or criticisms welcome, as usual. Much like after we’ve cooked the Christmas ham, all that’s left to do now is dig in: Continue reading

FFT: Salvaging Rusted Sill Plates

Oh I’m sorry, did you want some SEMA coverage? If you just can’t wait, then I must insist that you check out our footage of us walking the floor at SEMA and the Imperial Palace’s Car Collection.

 

Welcome back to the ongoing saga of my Oldsmobile-propelled, 1965 Chevrolet C-10, better known as the “Futuramic Farm Truck”. I want to go back to a post I made, following the bumpers I had for it. I probably should have asked my fellow 60-66 owners first, but being disillusioned with craigslist at the time (my love for it comes and goes), I scrapped them and made about $50 off the both of them. I promised I would post what I made off of them when I got rid of them, so there it is. I’m sure I could have made more had I sat on them a while longer, but I was tired of tripping over them every time I went to take out the trash, and I was going to recycle some other metals anyways. Now onto to the topic of today’s post: Continue reading

Modifying shock hangers on my 1996 C2500

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I know I’ve introduced the work I’ve done on my 1965 C-10; better known as the Futuramic Farm Truck (of which progress has been held captive searching for it’s Rocket heart). Now I’d like to introduce my daily driver*, a 1996 Chevrolet C2500. A unique vehicle, as only 5% of the C2500 trucks produced it’s year came with it’s powertrain: The underdog L30 5.0L Vortec mill. Rated at 230hp and 285ft lbs of torque, it wasn’t too far off from it’s vaunted big-brother, the L31 5.7L, rated at 250hp. Although it’s rather torque deficient compared to the 5.7L’s 330 ft lbs. Continue reading

96-02 “Vortec” Silencer Box Removal (Pop Can Mod)

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I’m sure a fellow 1st Generation Vortec engine aficionado has probably done this before, but in needing constant access to my distributor and intake manifold, I found a super cheap solution for getting rid of the big square Vortec silencer box.

If you’re tired of this bulky appliance taking up space above your intake manifold and reducing intake noise, we have a nearly free solution to get rid of it.

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