The Last Ford Galaxie

last-galaxie-sideIn October of 2015, I was on a road trip to New Mexico that took me though the old Route 66 town of Holbrook, Arizona. Holbrook is famous as the home of the Wigwam Motel, which has been featured in numerous movies for its teepee-shaped rooms.

The Wigwam plays up to tourists with a bunch of old cars parked on the property, ranging from 1940s to 1970s vehicles. Skipping past the Studebaker and the Oldsmobile, I went right for the malaise-era 1970s Ford Galaxie.

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1999 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon (Colony Park)

1999_mercury_grand_marquis_colony_park_wagon-taurus-rearWe’ve all seen ‘photoshopped’ wagons that never existed and if you lurk the crownvic.net forums hard enough you might even find a real life aero body with a 2nd generation Taurus hatch bolted on. Continue reading

The Death Of Visability And The Age Of Driving Blind

1985-mercury-sable-rearAll modern cars seem to be burdened with the task of keeping their occupants safe at all costs.  Which is a good thing, because all modern cars are impossible to see out of.  High beltlines create a claustrophobic sitting-in-a-bathtub feeling, and impossibly huge C-pillars bring visibility to near zero.  To me this is a chicken and egg situation.  Is it better to drive a tank with its hatch shut or actually see what you are doing? Continue reading

SEMA 2014: Trick Flow 1966 Ford Mustang KSV9000

mustang-ksv9000-sideI spotted this 1966 Ford Mustang at the Trick Flow booth at SEMA 2014. Nicknamed the KSV9000, it was built by Chris Slee of Kiwi Classics and Customs in Franklin, TN.

Chris is a former New Zealander who has relocated to Tennessee to tinker with building custom cars and projects. The KSV9000 blends  classic muscle car styling with modern performance.

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Hurst Ed 1968 Ford Mustang GT Restomod

hurst-1968-ford-mustang-rearAs with clothing and music, cars are also subject to generational fads in taste. One of the more popular looks right now is cars that are “murdered out.” This look involves a black car with black wheels and tires, dark tinted windows, tinted taillight lenses, and the removal of all trim, badging, and emblems. This gives the car a sinister look that is very en vogue right now.

This 1968 Mustang GT seems to have been built to rebel against the murdered out look! This car has so much white, it looks like it’s been “Angeled out” (a term I made up just now). But for all its heavenly whiteness, this Mustang can still run with the herd.

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SEMA 2014: Foose 1960 Ford Starliner

foose-1960-ford-starliner-profileFrom his early days as a designer for Boyd Coddington to the hit TV show Overhaulin‘, it’s safe to say that Chip Foose is one of the most recognized faces in the world of hot rodding. His automotive creations have grown beyond custom cars to include wheels, architecture, and even art!

Whether you love him or hate him, there is no denying that Chip Foose brings a lot of attention to the hobby of custom car building. One of his recent builds was this 1960 Ford Starliner coupe on display at the BASF booth at SEMA 2014.

The whole car looked absolutely flawless in BASF Metallic Grey paint from their Glasurit 90-series. It was wearing a set of Foose Heritage wheels which are 19″ up front and 20″ in the rear. But this car isn’t just a simple respray with some new shoes…it has a big surprise in the typical Foose fashion. Continue reading

1967 Ford Fairlane ‘Black Ops’ by Steve Strope

1967-fairlane-steve-strope-rearSteve Strope of Pure Vision Design was in the spotlight a few years ago with the Martini Mustang. He was back at SEMA 2014 with a real head turner, and quite possibly my favorite car of the whole show! This 1967 Ford Fairlane is called “Black Ops” and it was on display at the Dynamat/Dynamic Control booth in the Central Hall.

The name Black Ops warrants an explanation, seeing as the car is not painted black, but rather, a very pretty blue and gold. The concept for this car was to build an “experimental” racer as it might have been built back in the late 1960s. It is not based on any particular car that actually existed, but sought to recreate a “factory test mule” using period-correct parts and technologies. Continue reading