Kepler Motion Supercar

When PayPal co-founder Elon Musk launched a new company building mass-market electric cars, he was clever in picking the name Tesla Motors. Tesla was an 18th-century inventor and engineer who was obsessed with the properties electricity. He was a brilliant man who was under-appreciated in his own time, and using his name to sell electric-powered cars is a fitting tribute.

Taking a page from Elon Musk’s playbook, another upstart car company has adopted the moniker of a famous inventor. Meet the Motion supercar from Kepler Motors!

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How To Screw Up A Toyota Prius (Solar/Plug In)

It starts with actual screws and ends with genuine wood trim. You see, nothing screams “I care about the environment” quite like Chinese solar panels and sheet metal screws. Don’t get me wrong, I think converting a Prius into a full on plug in hybrid or possibly a low speed electric only vehicle is pretty cool.. but not like this, never like this. Continue reading

2012 Fisker Karma EcoSport EVer

“Shoot for the moon and if you miss, you will still be among the stars.” – Les Brown

At the time of this writing, California-based Fisker Automotive is in bad shape and if they don’t get a miracle, they are going to go under.

In case you haven’t been following the Fisker saga, let me fill you in. Fisker Automotive was founded in 2007 by Henrik Fisker, a Danish-born designer who also penned the Aston Martin DB9, the Aston Martin V8 Vantage, and the BMW Z8. The new company was to launch a luxury plug-in hybrid car in 2009. After multiple setbacks and delays, customers  finally began taking deliveries of the Karma sedan in late 2011. Continue reading

2013 Arizona International Auto Show – A Second Opinion

If you haven’t read Trevor‘s piece on the 2013 Arizona International Auto Show, I would suggest you go ahead and read it first because it very accurately describes the experience  of being at the show and driving the cars, but I figure I might as well chime in and give my take on the test drives as well.

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SEMA 2012: Google’s Driverless Toyota Prius

In March of 2004, the United States Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) held a competition in the Nevada desert called the Grand Challenge. The purpose was to determine if an autonomous, driverless car could negotiate a 150-mile off-road course on its own. The prize? A cool one million dollars.

Fifteen teams representing Carnegie-Mellon University and a variety of privately funded teams competed in the Challenge. Each team had equipped their car with a multitude of cameras, sensors, GPS units, and onboard computers in addition to off-road tires and heavy-duty suspensions.

Not one of the fifteen vehicles completed the challenge.

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