SEMA 2015: 1963 Corvette Racer by Mickey Thompson

1963-corvette-racer-frontYou can pretty much bet that the guys from Hot Rod magazine are going to have an awesome car on display at their SEMA booth. Last year, it was the stunning 1968 Charger “Sliced” from The Roadster Shop. This year, Hot Rod magazine went old school with this 1963 Corvette Racer by Mickey Thompson.

Today, 1963 Corvettes are among the most collectible, due to the one-year only split rear window. Before the collector market caught fire in the early 2000s, these cars were not worth nearly what they are today. It looks like this car may have been built back in the 1960s.

The coolest feature about the car is its extremely rare Smokey Yunick-built “Mystery Motor.” Back in the day, these guys took a W-series engine and modified it to become a 427-cid motor, which would eventually give rise to the Big Block engine. This motor is an early prototype, much like the original Apple computer in a wooden case.

I liked several other details of the car, from the racing steering wheel to the angled gauges. The interior is a no-frills environment with a roll cage and fire extinguisher, along with a stripped-down dashboard lacking a radio or A/C controls. This is a purpose-built racer, and it was made to be driven! I am eager to see what the guys at Hot Rod magazine will have on display for 2016!

FFT: Pulling the 455 Top End

Amidst all of the 2012 SEMA hubbub, I bring you the latest installment on my 455 Oldsmobile-powered 1965 C-10, better known as: The Futuramic Farm Truck.

As you know this time of year is not a productive in terms of free hours to work or money to spend. I’ve been putting off breaking out the impact gun and yanking the top end on the 455 because I spun it over and checked the oil when I traded it for my boat anchor smog-era 350. I had some free time between trees, turkeys and all that other stuff to get a little bit done, so this is what I chose to do. Like my piece on the rear suspension for my daily driver: Valkyrie, I’m going to be doing this article in a captioned picture style to illustrate what was going on as I did it. I hope you enjoy the change of pace, any comments or criticisms welcome, as usual. Much like after we’ve cooked the Christmas ham, all that’s left to do now is dig in: Continue reading