Classic Motor Carriages Gazelle Kit Car

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Although I feel my automotive proficiency is fairly well-rounded, there are a couple gaps in my knowledge. I understand that nobody is perfect, so I try not to beat myself up over the fact that I can’t make myself get into anything European or Japanese made before the mid-eighties, I’m not up to date on current supercars (hypercars? what are they calling them now?), and street rods all just look like the same ZZ Top album cover to me.

I also have a bad habit of  calling everything that that looks really old but not American either an Excalibur or a “Cruella de Vil Car”, depending on whether I am talking to a car guy or not. So when I saw this old lady barreling down the 17, with a death grip on the steering wheel and, I’m imagining, a cartoonish twinkle of determination in her eyes, taking a folding card table somewhere, wearing a rain poncho underneath her jacket, on a very hot, very dry day in Phoenix, I just assumed that I had just seen an Excalibur. A Cruella de Vil car.

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Classic Tiffany Is Remarkably Un-Classy

Are you a crazy old woman from England? Have you ever thought about making a coat out of dalmatian puppies? If so, we’ve got the perfect car for you!

What you are looking at is a Classic Tiffany, although it is often mistaken for an Excalibur or Clenet. This car began life as a seventh-gen Mercury Cougar and was transformed into this, um, interesting creation by Classic Motor Cars in Florida. It was not a kit car, but was coach built by CMC as a replica of a 1929 Mercedes-Benz SSK roadster. Continue reading

…Huh?

I caught this one a while back, out in Scottsdale, most likely around the time of all the car auctions that go on out there in the beginning of the year. When I saw it coming, I assumed it was some sort of Lincoln concept car for some reason, or possibly some kind of horrifying body kit slapped onto a Cougar, with sort of a Toronado Trofeo flavor. I was struggling to get my phone out of my pocket to get a picture and wasn’t really able to get a good look at it. It wasn’t until I got home and looked at the picture on the computer that I realized how obviously Fiero-based this thing was.

The car is actually a Zimmer Quicksilver, based on an stock 2.8, automatic Fiero. Only 170 of these atrocities were ever built.