Just Hop On The 101

While digging around the comment areas of various Facebook groups I have determined that the driver was likely not drunk, just trying to show off, with some of the other cars being ‘spotters’ and not civilian traffic. While it’s still incredibly dangerous it’s somewhat relieving to know that at least few precautions were taken. I’m not sure the benefit/risk ratio would have made it worth my while though.

Barrett-Jackson 2016: 1969 Olds F-85 W31

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So this is one of those cars where you wonder if at first it could actually be real. The seller attempted to advertise it as a Cutlass/f-85 but really that’s like calling Chevrolet’s platform twin a Chevelle/Malibu. This is an f-85, which was the name for the base model of Oldmobile’s A-body car.

To most people this is just another old muscle car. To the slightly more “initiated”, they might say it’s just another variation of the platform shared by the aforementioned Malibu, the Skylark or the Tempest. For the rest of us, the w-31 emblazoned on the fender says a little bit more.

How much more? How about 0-60 in 6.6 seconds and a factory rated 325hp, same as the 396 BBC found in the Chevelle. Look closely under the bumpers and you’ll see ram air scoops designed to shove cool outside air directly into the engine via snorkel tubes. This a design that is still found on modern cars today.

To find a combination of the base trim car with the high performance motor is really intriguing. More intriguing though is the car itself. Let your eyes be the judge.

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1965 Oldsmobile Starfire Hardtop Coupe

Back in the early 1960s, Oldsmobile wanted to build a full size sports-luxury coupe to compete with the Ford Thunderbird. They came up with the Starfire, which borrowed its name from the Lockheed F-94 airplane of the same name. Known for its tremendous speed, the F-94 was the first US production jet to come with an afterburner.

Oldsmobile’s Starfire was based on the Eighty-Eight and when it went into production in 1961, it was the most powerful and most expensive car they offered. What made this car special was its 425 cubic inch (7.0L) Rocket V8 engine, which was only used in the Starfire and the Jetstar. With a Rochester 4-barrel carburetor, the engine put out an easy 370 horsepower.

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Barrett-Jackson 2014 Sneak Peek

Snapped these shots after picking my press pass a couple hours ago. Enjoy!

Las Vegas Cars and Coffee 442 Blowout

Last year when we covered SEMA 2012 we had an opportunity to check out a local Cars and Coffee chapter. Though I was a little underwhelmed by the small turn out considering it was Vegas and SEMA week, I was happily surprised to see my favorite muscle car, the Oldsmobile 442, out in full force. It’s really odd to see this many Olds cars out at one event, so I imagine someone on an Olds forum must have coordinated it. My post about the GSX made me remember I had all these pictures that I had yet to share. So to my fellow Rocket-loving Oldsmobile fans, here’s some hot 442 action after the jump: Continue reading

Spinning Tires

Let’s take a look at the week gone by:

1973 Cutlass Supreme

I spotted this bad boy on my lunch break the other day.

Apparently, the ’76 Cutlass was the best selling American car of it’s year, but you hardly ever see these early third-gens. I would say this is hands down the best look out of all the A-Bodies from that era. It sort of takes all the little things that are actually kind of nice about the 73+ Chevelles and Monte Carlos and adds a little early second-gen Camaro flair to it.   The headlights look nice, there is minimal plastic, and the vinyl top is the same color as the car. I’d still prefer no vinyl at all but I could certainly live with it.

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FFT: Pulling the 455 Top End

Amidst all of the 2012 SEMA hubbub, I bring you the latest installment on my 455 Oldsmobile-powered 1965 C-10, better known as: The Futuramic Farm Truck.

As you know this time of year is not a productive in terms of free hours to work or money to spend. I’ve been putting off breaking out the impact gun and yanking the top end on the 455 because I spun it over and checked the oil when I traded it for my boat anchor smog-era 350. I had some free time between trees, turkeys and all that other stuff to get a little bit done, so this is what I chose to do. Like my piece on the rear suspension for my daily driver: Valkyrie, I’m going to be doing this article in a captioned picture style to illustrate what was going on as I did it. I hope you enjoy the change of pace, any comments or criticisms welcome, as usual. Much like after we’ve cooked the Christmas ham, all that’s left to do now is dig in: Continue reading