SEMA 2012: The 69’er II

[printprofilepic]

Let’s get this straight: As much as I love the old steel, I’m no hot rod historian. I stopped to snap some pictures of the 69’er because of the blown Oldsmobile drivetrain sitting between the frame rails.The front end looked familiar, but little did I know, I was looking at a piece of history.

Continue reading

FFT: Salvaging Rusted Sill Plates

Oh I’m sorry, did you want some SEMA coverage? If you just can’t wait, then I must insist that you check out our footage of us walking the floor at SEMA and the Imperial Palace’s Car Collection.

 

Welcome back to the ongoing saga of my Oldsmobile-propelled, 1965 Chevrolet C-10, better known as the “Futuramic Farm Truck”. I want to go back to a post I made, following the bumpers I had for it. I probably should have asked my fellow 60-66 owners first, but being disillusioned with craigslist at the time (my love for it comes and goes), I scrapped them and made about $50 off the both of them. I promised I would post what I made off of them when I got rid of them, so there it is. I’m sure I could have made more had I sat on them a while longer, but I was tired of tripping over them every time I went to take out the trash, and I was going to recycle some other metals anyways. Now onto to the topic of today’s post: Continue reading

1984 Oldsmobile Hurst/Olds Cutlass

[printprofilepic]

Aside from those BMW wheels (huh?) and the fire department wanna be pinstripes this is a pretty interesting car.

Back around the time when Oldsmobile made the ridiculous decision to make a small, front-wheel drive car and call it a Cutlass while continuing to make the same old rear-wheel drive car and also call it a Cutlass, they remembered an old gimmick they had tried before with moderate success: trying to make an automatic transmission fun to use.

Starting in 1983, you could order your Cutlass Supreme with the Hurst/Olds package, which had some pretty decent options, like a better flowing exhaust, 3.73s, and supposedly the 307 had some slight improvements.

The main feature though, were the Hurst “Lightning Rod” shifters. I’ve been watching a couple videos of them in operation and I really can’t see any benefit from using them at all, other than showing them off and pretending you’ve got a Lenco or something. They make for an interesting conversation piece though.

The Hurst/Olds was only made in this body style for two years, 83 and 84, and it’s really easy to spot the difference between the two years. 83s were black with silver rocker panels, and 84s had a reversed paint scheme. 84s also came with the 8.5″ rear end from the Grand National while the 83s got the 7.5. After 84, they started calling the car the 442 again. As far as I can tell, the Lightning Rods were only available in the 83-84 Hurst/Olds car though.

I hope that one day this car gets reunited with its stock wheels (for that matter, any old set of 15’s would be a major improvement) and cleaned up a little bit, but I’m still just happy that someone is keeping it on the road in any capacity.

FFT: Quentin Tarantino Edition

My last post about the bumper made me realize how effortlessly I could make this thing sell, so yesterday I decided to do just that. As a responsibility to fellow gearheads, I have to say that I would not recommend using the paint that I used despite my good results with it. If you really want a nice, durable, long-lasting finish I would suggest doing it the right way and avoiding aerosols all together. With that said, if you’re just going to sell it on Craigslist and it’s mechanically sound and/or structurally safe: Do what you have to.

So to reiterate, this post brings the Futuramic Farm Truck build up to present times, only for today and without any spoilers. The next post for FFT will pick up where we left off.

Continue reading

FFT: The Beginning

This truck was an 18th birthday present from my parents. It’s a 1965 Chevy C-10 LWB Fleetside. I finally have my own garage so I’ve begun to tear down now, nearing my 26th birthday. I’ve gotten quite a ways past the pictures you’ll see here, but in the interest of keeping my updates short and readable, I’ll start from the beginning. Continue reading