1967 VW Karmann Ghia V10 ‘Blue Mamba’

It is a common practice in the auto industry to name a sporty car after a fearsome or powerful animal. Cars like the Mustang, Impala, Cougar, and Shelby Cobra all borrow their names from the animal kingdom.

Along those lines, Keith Goggin decided to give his 1967 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia the nickname “Blue Mamba.” It’s a reference to the black mamba, a venomous snake found throughout central Africa. They are some of the fastest-moving snakes on earth, and also extremely deadly.

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1966 Chrysler Imperial “The Tyrant”

Automobile manufacturers typically build two types of cars: regular passenger vehicles and wild, tire-squealing, high-revving performance vehicles. The latter is usually done by a company’s in-house performance division.

Mercedes’ in-house performance division is AMG. BMW has their M division. Over at Chrysler, they have the Street and Racing Technology (SRT) team, which grew out of the original “Team Viper” group that was formed in 1989.

Since its inception 25 years ago, SRT has created high performance versions of many Chrysler vehicles including the Neon SRT-4, the Chrysler 300 SRT8 sedan, and the Ram SRT-10 Pickup. But what if SRT had existed back in the 1960s? What kind of cars would they have built? The guys at HPI Customs in Manitoba, Canada decided to try and answer that question.

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2005 Ford Shelby GR-1 Concept Car

Back in 2005, the Ford Motor Company wanted to do something special to celebrate their 100th anniversary. What they did was come out with a special, limited-production car called the Ford GT. This mid-engined supercar was inspired by Ford’s famous GT40 racing cars from the 1960s.

The Ford GT has a supercharged V8 engine that makes a whopping 550 horsepower! Aside from a roll cage, this thing is basically a street-legal racing car. Like all good things, the Ford GT was only around for a limited time. After two years and 4,000 vehicles, Ford ended production of their high performance supercar.

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2004 Ford Shelby Cobra Roadster Concept Car

One of the most famous vehicles in muscle car history is the Shelby Cobra of the 1960s. The car was designed to do two things: go fast and win races. Shelby achieved this result by wedging a big engine into a small, light car body. The car did very well in competitions, but lackluster sales in the US led Shelby to end production in 1967.

Ford provided engines for the original Shelby Cobras, and in 2004 the company wanted to show off a concept vehicle that reflected upon the motorsports heritage of the Shelby Cobra. Continue reading