Allard J2X MkIII: The British Roadster Reimagined

Following the end of World War II, the Allard Motor Company of London began producing high performance cars. The company made several models of cars from coupes to cabriolets to an 8-passenger estate, but they found their greatest success with light weight cars optimized for racing.

These two-seat roadsters ran in competitions throughout Europe and North America in the early 1950s. Though the company had some successful models, they were cash-strapped and were bankrupt by 1958, having produced approximately 1,900 vehicles in total.

In 1999, Roger Allard revived the Allard brand under the name Allard Motor Works. The company’s signature product is the J2X MkIII, a high-performance sports car with beautiful vintage styling. The car is a faithful replica of the original Allard J2X, but with modern (and more reliable) powertrain options.

The cars are hand-crafted in Southern California to the owner’s specifications. Due to this unique and exclusive build process, production is limited to no more than 100 vehicles per year. There are several crate engine options available from both General Motors and MOPAR, depending on the buyer’s preference.

I caught up with this sharp red Allard J2X MkIII roadster at Highline Autos Cars and Coffee in Arizona on August 6, 2022.

The two-seater car features a long hood, short rear deck, and no roof or top whatsoever. The large, flared wheel arches stick out from the car’s slender body.

The car has no heater, radio, or glove box – just a couple of gauges mounted to a beautiful engine-turned dashboard. It is finished in red with a black leather interior. This one is equipped with an automatic transmission, though I was not able to determine which engine it has.

The price of a J2X MkIII depends on options, with a base model build costing around $150,000 to $180,000. Again, keep in mind that these cars are hand-built to order, not mass-produced.

For my money, I would rather have a Superformance MkIII roadster as I prefer the look of those cars over the Allard. But the Allard certainly has its place, especially for those fans of British roadsters who have the means to enjoy it.

Vaydor Supercar: Premium Body Kit for the G35

There are a lot of folks out there who would love to own a supercar, but don’t have that kind of money.

For those seeking a car with exotic looks on a budget, the Vaydor Supercar may be the answer you are looking for. The Vaydor is a front-engine sports car that utilizes a 2003-07 Infiniti G35 coupe as a donor car.

The Vaydor made its debut in 2013 at the SEMA Show in Las Vegas. Designed by Matt McEntegart, the car is offered as a coupe or as a hardtop convertible. Matt later sold the Vaydor name to an investment group in 2018 who continues to manufacture and market the cars today. The fiberglass bodies are manufactured by Custom Crafted Cars in St. Petersburg, Florida.

The Vaydor bodykit is available for DIY builds starting at $16,000 for the exterior body components, doors, and roll cage. The kit can be purchased as a coupe or as a convertible. Interior kits are also available for $5,500 as of the time of this writing.

The company provides support to builders and includes instructions on dismantling the donor car, welding in the roll cage, and fitting the body panels. However, the paint and bodywork, wheels and tires, and any upgrades to suspension or braking are all at the builder’s expense.

If building your own car is not a challenge that excites you, you’ll be glad to hear that you can also custom order a Vaydor to your exact specifications. Complete turn-key cars are offered by Custom Crafted Cars, with build times taking approximately 6 months. The turn-key cars include a 650 horsepower LT4 supercharged V8 engine and have manual or automatic transmission options.

I saw this Vaydor supercar at my local Highline Autos Cars and Coffee event in Phoenix on August 6, 2022. Looking sharp in lime green with black accents, the car drew a lot of attention from onlookers.

This car has its own headlamps and taillamps, which are not sourced from another vehicle as with some other cars sold as kits. This gives the car a very unique look and causes even seasoned automotive enthusiasts to pause for a closer look. The owner will be forever answering the question at every gas pump, stop light, and car show: “What is it?”

Custom touches include a Sparco steering wheel, racing seats with Tanaka harnesses, carbon fiber canards on the front bumper, forged wheels with Lionhart tires.

The front, rear, and fender emblems on the car have been replaced with the coat of arms of Ukraine, featuring the “Tryzub” or trident symbol which represents freedom.

No idea if this car is using the stock Nissan VQ 3.5L V6 engine or if it has been swapped with something else. If you know more information about this car, please post a comment and let us know!

1983 Camaro Stiletto

I’ve always thought myself to be a bit of a third generation Camaro aficionado. This would be the 1982-92 run of cars that were the perfect combination of sport and style. What the first year models lacked in power, they made up for in good looks and great handling. Don’t believe me? Ask that car god you hipsters all pray to: Jeremy Clarkson.

By 1983, the Camaro came with the 190hp 305-cubic inch L69. It’s classic combination of a 4bbl carb, hot cam, a good set of heads, and a manual transmission brought the lowly, five-liter, Chevy mill out of malaise-era limbo. From then on, the Camaro just got more bad ass as each year passed.

1983 was also the year for this strange, Ferrari 308-looking, coach-bodied 3rd gen, called the Stiletto. As you can see from the craigslist ad (or click here for a screenshot) it’s obviously strange, different and well-kept. I don’t know if that translates to being rare in the sense of being valuable, but it certainly is something you’ll probably never see again. Strangely enough, I came across this simply searching for “camaro” under our local phoenix craigslist.

Although the previously mentioned 190hp L69 was the hottest engine at the time, I assume they chose to use the lesser 165hp LU5 crossfire because it looks cooler and was more “futuristic” in it’s time because of it’s dual throttle-body setup. I’m sure that eventually it will be an engine people remember fondly, but like other people approaching their thirties with a car-loving parent I was taught that “Crossfire” will always be synonymous with “Piece of Shit”.

At $25,000 they only want half as much as the 1LE that we saw the year before last at the Imperial Palace car museum. I’ll let you be the judge on whether that price is a bargain. Hopefully we cross paths with this ultra rare third gen at next year’s Barrett Jackson, which is just around the corner. Until then, enjoy the rest of these pictures from the craigslist ad.

1988 Enterra Vipre Kit Car

Canada is famous for a number of great things including hockey, maple syrup, and Jim Carrey. Unfortunately, building cars is not one of their strong suits. Take the Enterra Vipre for example: it was essentially a factory-built kit car that was based on the Pontiac Fiero GT and was sold through Pontiac dealerships.

While the car was clad in different body panels that gave it the classic 80s “wedge shape,” underneath it had the same suspension, chassis, and drivetrain as the Fiero. It also sported taillights from a first-generation Chevrolet Cavalier. Small wonder that just 36 cars were built before the company closed up shop!

My first encounter with the Enterra happened at a local car show in 2006. After perusing row after row of hot rods and muscle cars, something different caught my eye. From a distance, it could have been a Corvette or a third-gen Camaro with a body kit. Once I got closer, I realized it was a project that was pretty rough around the edges – and as I was about to find out, so was the car’s owner. Continue reading